Tooth Health And Morning Sickness

Most women experience nausea during their pregnancy. Even though it is referred to as morning sickness, it occurs during the day at any time. Accompanying nausea will usually subside after the first trimester of pregnancy. However, it may last longer for some women. While there are some natural remedies to help with the effects of nausea, many of them are damaging to teeth. Learn how you can protect your teeth while dealing with nausea.

Water With Lemon

Drinking lemon water is a common cure used to help with morning sickness. The issue with lemon water is that the acidity causes enamel erosion to the teeth. If you must use lemon water, use a straw when drinking to limit exposure of the acids to your teeth. As well, when drinking lemon water, it is best to drink it all in one sitting, rather than sipping it throughout the day over a long period. It is also never a good idea to directly suck on a lemon due to the high acidity levels. Alternatively, some women report relief from smelling peppermint or lemon.

lemon water for morning sickness

Lemonade or Gingerale

These drinks are bad for teeth because they contain a large amount of sugars and are acidic. Instead, try to add a few slices of ginger to water which tends to have a higher concentration of ginger anyways.

Candies

Some candies are marketed as anti-nausea candies. Many of these candies are slow dissolving and contain sugars that are damaging to teeth due to their prolonged contact against the teeth. Opt for sugar-free versions if possible.

Crackers

Some women find that snacking on saltine crackers helps curb nausea. However, the bad bacteria in the mouth easily digest the carbohydrates found in crackers, which produces the damaging acids that cause dental decay. Rinse your mouth with water after eating to flush away leftover food particles, and remember to brush and floss your teeth after.

Call us today if you have any questions about your oral health.

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